Buromskiy Island burial ground (HSM 9 and HSM 7) WAP RUS-NEW

Buromskiy, 66°  32’South, 93° 0’ East is a small island lying 0.6 km (0.37 mi) south of Haswell Island in the Haswell Islands group in Antarctica. About 1.2 km long and 0.9 km wide, it was discovered and mapped by the Australasian Antarctic Expedition under Douglas Mawson (1911–14). It was photographed by the Soviet expedition of 1958 and named for N.I. Buromskiy, expedition hydrographer who lost his life in the Antarctic in 1957. It lies 2.7 km north of Marbus Point, the site of Russia’s Mirny Station.

Buromskiy Island holds a Cemetery for several citizens of the Soviet Union, Czechoslovakia, German Democratic Republic and Switzerland who died in the performance of their duties while serving as members of Soviet and Russian Antarctic expeditions. It has been designated a Historic Site or Monument (HSM 9) following a proposal by Russia to the Antarctic Treaty Consultative Meeting

The site includes Ivan Khmara’s Stone, with an inscribed plaque commemorates Ivan Khmara, a driver-mechanic with the first Soviet Antarctic Expedition, who died while performing his duties on fast ice on 21 January 1956. The stone was originally erected at nearby Mabus Point, but was moved to Buromskiy Island in 1974 because of construction activity at Mirny. Ivan Khmara’s Stone has been designated a Historic Site or Monument (HSM 7) following a proposal by Russia to the Antarctic Treaty Consultative Meeting.

 

The Haswell Islands are a group of rocky coastal islands lying off Marbus Point, Antarctica, and extending about 3 kilometres (1.5 nmi) seaward. Douglas Mawson did apply the name “Rookery Islands” because of a large emperor penguin rookery on Haswell Island, the largest and seaward island in the group. In 1955 the Antarctic Names Committee of Australia proposed that the name Haswell be extended to the entire Group. Read more at: http://www.wikiwand.com/en/Religion_in_Antarctica

Buromskiy Island burial ground (HSM 9 and HSM 7)

66° 32’South, 93° 0’ East , North of Marbus Point, Haswell Islands will be add to WAP-WADA Directory as WAP RUS-NEW. As soon as some Hams, maybe from Mirny Base will operate from there, a reference number will be given.

Cruising Antarctica-K4RXP on board M/V Spirit of Enderby

John Landrigan KA4RXP is planning the ultimate of all cruises; leaving New Zealand on Feb 8, 2018 going to McMurdo Station on the Ross Sea and returning on March 8 ; he will join the 15th Antarctic Activity Week.

John wrote: -The 50-passenger M/V Spirit of Enderby is described as an ‘intimate’ exploration vessel with a reinforced hull. It apparently is pretty cramped and the bathroom is down the hall. The Captain and crew are Russian and I was advised to bring a potent surge protector .

I have the Company’s permission to operate and they are going to allow me unrestricted access to the former Radio Room on the ship so that I can set up my Yaesu 897 and Pactor modem.

I’m going to pay for them to install a used, I hope, marine HF antenna.  I’ll bring an antenna of a type and brand to be determined.

Few Questions from John:

The ship’s generator is subject to severe fluctuations due to lights and equipment being turned on and off. I need suggestions for 220 volt surge protection/Uninterruptible power supply devices to protect my radio and computer equipment. I don’t know how frequently they blow light bulbs but it sounds like a potent damping system may be required.

I am thinking the experts at this are probably in Invercargill, New Zealand where the ship departs from. I know that propagation is inversely proportional to one’s distance from the North or South Pole. I am thinking that a HF vertical and tuner would be significantly better than just my magnetically mounted Little Tarheel Screwdriver.

What about some type of dipole as you often see on models and photos of old ships with a wire going from bow to stern masts?  The ship’s manager did say I would need about 100 feet of coax from the antenna to the Radio Room. I am wondering if they were thinking of stringing up that type of antenna and running coax down a mast to the Radio Room.

Anyone with marine HF experience is earnestly solicited to respond (ka4rxp@gmail.com )

This cruise will be right at the time of the 15th Antarctic Activity Week and John KA4RXP/MM will be the first to operate maritime mobile during an AAW ! He will be on 40 through 10 meters if propagation will permit.John sais.

TNX John Landrigan KA4RXP

LU4ZS, Base Marambio WAP ARG-21

On last March 11, the Radio station LU4ZS at Base Marambio did start the 2016 Ham Activation, promoting the continuity of successful Radio-Amateur operation of the past 2013/14 Antarctic campaign, in which hundreds of Shortwave contacts were made worldwide. This year 2017, it has been planned to carry out another activation.

Putting LU4ZS on the air from Marambio has as an additional motivation:  the memory of the 50th anniversary of the First Transpolar Flight of Argentina. In 1965, the Air Force accomplished “Operation South”, designed and led by then-commander Mario Luis Olezza, in which a squadron formed by a Douglas C-47 and two Beaver single-engineers landed in the South Pole, and later the C-47 Continued flight to Mc Murdo Base, USA, completing the first double transpolar flight in Argentina. This operation opened the route that Aerolineas Argentinas used between 1980 and 2014 to fly to Oceania.

The operator of the station LU4ZS Marambio, is Juan C. Benavente (Picture aside), in charge of the Press Section and collaborator of the Technical Section of the DAA, with Ham license LU8DBS r, teacher and Graduate in Social Communication in the National University of Quilmes (UNQ).

Video taken by a member of the “Uniendo Voices” Tam during his stay in Antarctica. The UV project has incorporated the radio amateur work area, and a teacher of the project, Juan C. Benavente, carries out radio activations from Antarctica as the University Extension Project (PEU).

Read more at: http://www.unq.edu.ar/noticias/1950-marambio-en-el-aire.php

Giacomo Bove Station-Antarctica (WAP ITA-Ø2)

Soon the formal designation of the new Historic Site (HSMs) under the Antarctic Treaty.
Another small step towards the creation of a new visitor center and a new plaque in Trieste (Italy), in view of the completion of the IPSSIA project (the institution of the first Antarctic Italian Historical Site).

This is briefly, the story of the first independent Italian expedition in Antarctica dated 1976, and of the man who made it possible. The Polishs, who have a nearby science base, still call the site as Italy Valley.

December 1975: 15 Italians  did challenge the climatic conditions, economic difficulties and political inertia to build a Base in the coldest and inhospitable site of the planet, with temperatures that in the “hot” months reach 19 degrees below zero and during the long winter of the sub-southern hemisphere go down to -50°C. The Expedition arrives before the accession of Italy to the Antarctic Treaty, before the PNRA, the National Research Program at the South Pole.

Renato Cepparo officially donate the newly founded Base to the Italian state. But the answer that comes from the cabinet secretary of the the Foreign Affairs holder, Minister Arnaldo Forlani, is as formal and cold as the wind of Italia Valley  on a January day!

“While I express the greatest appreciation of the On. Minister of Foreign Affairs, I would like to inform you that the Italian Government intends to give the Base to the Argentine Government”. The reason “Guarantees for Future Research and Exploration Programs in Antarctica or Other Italian Scientific Missions”, did sound  incomprehensible for Cepparo and that decision was difficult to accept. It was paradoxical –did comment Roberto Cepparo– Forlani proved himself to be a very small man, because to solve the problem with the Argentinians gave them the Base. Two years later, Flavio Barbiero, deputy leader of the company in 1975-76, returns to Italia Valley and makes the dramatic discovery: “Only the perimeter wall supporting the building remained in place. Everything else has disappeared in nothing” wrote Renato Cepparo in his memories.

Actually, a young reasearchr Prof. PHD Julius Fabbri  (Pic aside) is strongly working to ensure that the status of Antarctic Heritage could be recognized to the site where Renato Cepparo built the first Italian research station dedicated to the explorer Giacomo Bove

Stanislaw Miranski SP3BGD, send us a picture taken in April 1998. Here is the remains of Italian Antarctic Station “Giacomo Bove” – Italia Valley on King George island.

 

Cambridge petition: Historic Site for ‘Giacomo Bove Station’ destroyed by Argentine Navy – Read more at: http://giacomobovestation.blogspot.it/2017/04/cambridge-petition-historic-site-for.html

Polish Station Dobrowolsky, WAP POL-NEW

Polish Antarctic Stations Antoni B. Dobrowolski is located an Bunger Hills, 66° 16′ 30″ South, 100° 45′ 00″ East.

The Station with two buildings able to guest 8 people, was originally built by the Soviet Antarctic Expeditions the Oct. 16th  1956 and named Oazis  then, on 23rd January 1959, it has been handed over to the Academy of Sciences of the Polish People’s Republic by the Soviet Academy. The Polish named it Dobrowolski Station in memory of  Antoni B. Dobrowolski (1872-1954), geophysicist and glaciologist, who participated in the Belgica Antarctic Expedition (1877-79). 

Unfortunately,  just few weeks later the Station has been closed. On February 22, 1979 (with preparations starting February 18) the station was reactivated for a short time, but an overwintering attempt failed, and the occupants had to be evacuated to Mirny Station (350 km to the west) on March 17 1979.

The Soviet Union became interested in the Bunger Hills again in the late 1980s, and built a new station – Oazis-2 – a few hundred meters to the west of Dobrowolski. The station was used for summer visits up to the mid-1990s (Bunger Oasis Station WAP RUS-NEW)

About 7 kilometres from Dobrowolski, Australia has maintained the summer-only station Edgeworth David Base,   named after Edgeworth David, since 1986.

The concrete pillar erected by the First Polish Antarctic Expedition at Dobrowolski Station in January 1959 for gravity measurements, and the magnetic observatory at the station with plaque in memory of the opening of Oazis Station in 1956, are recognized as Antarctic Historic Sites Nr.10.

DP1POL/p Novolazarevskaya Station-Antarctica

Felix Riess  (DL5XL) has been activeas DP1POL/p  for a short period of time from the Russian Station Novolazarevskaya  (WAP RUS-Ø9) while waiting the ALCI flight from Novo Runway (WAP MNB-Ø6) to Cape Town.

Novolazarevskaya ( 70° 47’ South, 11°49’ East) located at the extreme southeastern tip of the Schirmacher Oasis approximately in 80 km from the Lazarev Sea coast,  is one of the most efficient Antarctic Stations operating from Dronning Maud Land Estern Antarctica and serving by its Novo Runway almost all the scientific operations from the Bases located in that area. An ice shelf with a slightly undulating surface resting against an ice cap extends north of the station in the vicinity of Leningradsky Bay. From the south, there is a continental ice sheet slope.

DP1POL/p is though one of the new callsigns to be add to the WAP-WACA list.

Thanks to Felix for this new one and thanks to DL1ZBO for is fast QSL service.

Polish “Henryk Arctowski” Station WAP POL-Ø1

The station was established on 26 February 1977.
It is managed by the Polish Academy of Sciences, and its main research areas include marine biology, oceanography, geology, geomorphology, glaciology,  meteorology, climatology, seismology, magnetism and ecology.

Here, just a couple of nice  pics posted on Facebook page today

If you wish to see more, go to:   https://www.facebook.com/arctowski/?hc_ref=ARStEccV8QfpVV7boSs6EsLGB55pSF-fzssR981ZH8OOu9g_AHpbr6MzV-gMMcwpLGg

 

To know more about Henryk Arctowski Station, see also:  http://sunsite.icm.edu.pl/dab/

New WAP WACA & WADA Directory just released

The sixteenth edition (release 1.30) of WAP WACA & WADA Directories are available to download. Just go to the “Download Section”  and feel free to save them both on your PC.

WACA Directory contains a list of more than 4091 callsigns used in Antarctica & Sub Antarctic territories since 1945,

WADA Directory lists 887 Baes, Camps, Huts, Refuges and  Stations in Antarctica since 1945.

Also a new release of the Antarctic & Peri Antarctic Lighthouses has been issued on July 31 and it’s available to download as well; just go to the Lighthouse page.

Don’t forget to check the Antarctic Bulletin Nr. 274 issued on last July 24 (Check News & Information page)

Enjoy Antarctica!

73 from WAP Staff

DP1POL Neumayer III Station (WAP DEU-Ø8)

Felix Riess DL5XL (aka N5BC) is operating DP1POL callsign from Antarctica since 2002.
Every time he was there, he did visit some very rare and difficult locations, from which he was able to so set a /P operation  and jumping on the air as well .
Neumayer III Station , is located  at 70° 40’ South, 8° 17’ West, Dronning Maud Land (Grid Loc. IB59UH).

 

 

Double folded QSL for his last operation did come fast through his QSL Manager DL1ZBO. Nice card, another good piece in our Antarctic QSL collection!

 

TNX Felix DL5XL & TNX Ray DL1ZBO

RI1ANC Vostok Base “WAP RUS-13”

Alex Turkeev, RD1AV,  the actual Chief and radio operator at the Russian Vostok Station is still overwintering  at Vostok where he will remain till February 10, 2018.

He is active ,taking advantages of the openings in the actual low level propagation. It’s not hard to find him  on all bands CW, SSB and digital modes.

Do not loose the chance to work him.  Antarctica is always something special in the DX scenery!

 

QSL for RI1ANC has to be requested  through  RN1ON – Bureau or Direct

Argentine Icebreaker Irizar readying for Antarctica sailing

Argentina’s Navy icebreaker ARA Almirante Irizar is back on sea and next September will be ready to sail to Antarctica following almost ten years of recovery and refurbishing after she caught fire in 2007 when returning from Antarctica and was considered almost a wreck given the magnitude of the damages experienced.

According to Argentine defense reports the “new” Irizar has state of the art technology, has doubled its Antarctic Gas Oil (fuel) capacity and has increased six fold the area dedicated to labs and other scientific activities, as well as the cabins and beds for research staff.

The pre-accident Irizar was mainly involved in logistics and support for the Antarctic bases and stations, but the refurbished version is geared to scientific research. Likewise the icebreaker will be able to access the most austral of Argentine bases, Belgrano II, and the Argentine navy can again operate with helicopters.

All these years Argentina contracted mostly Russian icebreakers and helicopters to service and supply its bases.

More at:  http://www.marambio.aq/infoprensa/julio2017.html   

RI1ANO, Bellingshausen Base WAP RUS-Ø1

Another “new one” WACA in our Antarctic QSL collection and a WAP RUS-Ø1 for WADA

RI1ANO is a  a brand new callsign,  operated by Alexandr A. Ushakov, UA1OJL, at Bellingshausen Base (WAP RUS-Ø1) on King George Island, South Shetland Islands. Alex, UA1OJL is  active from Bellingshausen station, since April 2017 and will be on till March 2018 operating all bands CW, SSB & Digi  on his  spare time.

Info for  QSL collectors: Contacts from June 2017 and ahead will be confirmed by a different QSL cards (see the sample aside), so do not loose the chance.

QSL for RI1ANO has to be requested to RN1ON (Alexei V. Kuz’manko, P.O.Box 500, Arkangelsk 173000-Russia)

VU2VP Silent Key

 Ved Prakash Sandlas, VU2VP, destingushed Scientist & former Cheif controller R&D DRDO did  pass away on 6th July 2017. He was good promoter of Ham radio & sent Ham Radio Rigs to Antarctica.

He was Vice Presendent of the Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation (AMSAT- India), a real Senior Old Timer. He has been QSL manager for AT3D, operated by VU3DEN in 1994 from Maitri Base, Antarctica.

Our deepest condolences to his family from the whole HAM & Scientists  as well as the Antarctic community !

Base Belgrano II (WAP ARG-Ø6)

Twenty-one Argentine experts who will investigate climate change are actually working  at the country’s southernmost Antarctic Belgrano II Base.

The scientific and military experts are facing a four-month long polar night after landing more than 4,500 kilometers away from Buenos Aires and less than 1,700 from the South Pole.

With temperatures that can reach around or below – 35° Celsius,  Belgrano II is the southernmost of the Argentine bases and is located to the east of the Weddell Sea, so the newly arrived staff will not have contact with people outside the group until they are relieved in December 2017.
Click on the pic aside to be rederected to the website where the information comes from.