Buromskiy Island burial ground (HSM 9 and HSM 7) WAP RUS-NEW

Buromskiy, 66°  32’South, 93° 0’ East is a small island lying 0.6 km (0.37 mi) south of Haswell Island in the Haswell Islands group in Antarctica. About 1.2 km long and 0.9 km wide, it was discovered and mapped by the Australasian Antarctic Expedition under Douglas Mawson (1911–14). It was photographed by the Soviet expedition of 1958 and named for N.I. Buromskiy, expedition hydrographer who lost his life in the Antarctic in 1957. It lies 2.7 km north of Marbus Point, the site of Russia’s Mirny Station.

Buromskiy Island holds a Cemetery for several citizens of the Soviet Union, Czechoslovakia, German Democratic Republic and Switzerland who died in the performance of their duties while serving as members of Soviet and Russian Antarctic expeditions. It has been designated a Historic Site or Monument (HSM 9) following a proposal by Russia to the Antarctic Treaty Consultative Meeting

The site includes Ivan Khmara’s Stone, with an inscribed plaque commemorates Ivan Khmara, a driver-mechanic with the first Soviet Antarctic Expedition, who died while performing his duties on fast ice on 21 January 1956. The stone was originally erected at nearby Mabus Point, but was moved to Buromskiy Island in 1974 because of construction activity at Mirny. Ivan Khmara’s Stone has been designated a Historic Site or Monument (HSM 7) following a proposal by Russia to the Antarctic Treaty Consultative Meeting.

 

The Haswell Islands are a group of rocky coastal islands lying off Marbus Point, Antarctica, and extending about 3 kilometres (1.5 nmi) seaward. Douglas Mawson did apply the name “Rookery Islands” because of a large emperor penguin rookery on Haswell Island, the largest and seaward island in the group. In 1955 the Antarctic Names Committee of Australia proposed that the name Haswell be extended to the entire Group. Read more at: http://www.wikiwand.com/en/Religion_in_Antarctica

Buromskiy Island burial ground (HSM 9 and HSM 7)

66° 32’South, 93° 0’ East , North of Marbus Point, Haswell Islands will be add to WAP-WADA Directory as WAP RUS-NEW. As soon as some Hams, maybe from Mirny Base will operate from there, a reference number will be given.

India 71st Independence Day celebration in Antarctica

India celebrates its 71st Independence Day with the Prime Minister Narendra Modi hoisting the tricolour from Red Fort. A huge Indian national flag has brought on a bridge across river Sabarmati to celebrate Independence Day in Ahmadabad, but what do they do in Antarctica?

Bharati Station is the last Indian research Base built by India in Antarctica. Located at 69° 24’ 28” South, 76° 11’ 14” East, Bharati Station is one of the most modern Scientific Base in the Icy Continent. Actually a Radioamateur VU3LPL Rajesh Dabral is overwintering at Bharati Base, acting as Communication Officer.

The arrival of the nieighboring Russian and Chinese station members and the friendship among the three stations reveals that Antarctica is a place for peace and friendship. I invite everyone of you to join us in the celebration.

Full coverage of celebration of 71st Indian Independence Day at Bharati Research Station , Antarctica on 15, august 2017 is here, enjoy the view.
WAP Staff, wish a very Happy Indipendence day to our Indian friends in Antarctica.

RESCUE IN ANTARCTICA

In an unprecedented operation, the Argentinean Armed Forces planned a medical evacuation of the second officer, electrician Héctor Bulacio, from the Orcadas Base to the hospital in Ushuaia. The 38-year-old man was in danger if thye did not move him; he had suffered fractures in his legs. A Rescue by sea was impossible because in winter time the Base is surrounded by 110 kilometers of ice field.

After a videoconference with the naval hospital of Buenos Aires, his air evacuation was decided.

A C130 Hercules aircraft took off from Río Gallegos, overflew  Orcadas Base and  by parachutes release medical supplies while a glaceologist of the Naval Hydrography Service was studying  the best surface in which personnel could improvise an emergency landing strip for a Twin Otter. From Marambio Base then took off the Twin Otter  that flew 720 kilometers from Marambio to Orcadas Base and,  in an unprecedented event, did land on top of a glacier on an improvised runway.

The Twin Otter transferred the non-commissioned officer to Marambio and from there the Hercules took him to Tierra del Fuego. The joint work and successful flights of the Twin Otter and the Hercules despite the climatic difficulties at this time of year, allowed the Sub-official Bulacio to be conscious and stabilized in the Hospital of Ushuaia where he is  “out of danger”.

More at: https://www.eldiariodelfindelmundo.com/noticias/2017/07/31/73203-increible-hazana-aerea-para-salvarle-la-vida-a-un-militar-herido-en-la-base-orcadas-de-la-antartida

More pics are available at the same link

Brief History of the Antarctic, seen from the Ham Radio Communication’s world

Written by Bhagwati Prasad Semwal VU3BPZ-8T2BH

Antarctic Epic did start long ago with no way to communicate from Antarctica to the rest of the world, then Guglielmo Marconi, an Italian inventor and electrical engineer, known for his pioneering work on long-distance radio transmission and for his development of radio telegraph system, show the world the power of Radio transmission.

Later one after WW1 & WW2 the Nations signed the Antarctic Treaty and the Antarctic Adventure begun. From that time, in the 50thies, the Radio was the unique way to be in touch from the newly built Antarctic Research Stations and therest of the world.

From that time,  being a licensed Radio Amateur was a privilege of few technicians involved in the  Antarctic Campaigns and being Radio Amateur, they were mostly communication officers. After the commercial duties and communication with their country’s Antarctic Departments, they had time to use the Base Equipments to talk to the family using other Ham fellows with Phone Patch to talk to their families, and to other Ham radio men, all over the world.

A new era did start: DX with Antarctica and yes,  a contact using a simple Radio transceiver  from Antarctica to the rest of the world was,  and is still amazing. The interest did grow  fast and became a fever, a real excitement a real passion.

At that time every Antarctic Base, every Refuge, every remote camp was equipped with  Transceiver for HF communications, antenna, generator or other power supply sources.

Most of the Bases did install big towers and rotary antenna system, using amplifiers to allow more chance to send robust signals on the air. On the other side, the worldwide Ham community, hunting contacts with Antarctica, did the same; all involved in a kind of passion for the so called  very long distance call, known as DX.

QSL confirmation for a contact with an Antarctic Station was, and still is something to exhibit. On the meantime the first websites dedicated to the Antarctic Chasers did start to be online, as for example WAP-Worldwide Antarctic Program www.waponline.it since 1979. On it several features  such as the most accurate Dbase (WAP-WADA) of Antarctic Stations, Remote Camps, Refuges, Huts and permanent settlements sorted by Country, Lat & Long and exact location.

Another huge Dbase (WAP-WACA) has been built; it  lists over 4500 different callsigns in use or used in the past in Antarctica, Sub & Peri Antarctic areas, all available for free on line.

Time goes fast and we did enter quickly in the era of Internet. Very few young  boys are still excited or fascinated by Ham radio, even if in Antarctica HF & VHF communications are still important and very much used to keep and establish contacts with remote field camps, with the researchers working outside, and with the helicopters or aircrafts to the main Stations or Bases.

Radio is probably considered by the young generation somewhat obsolete, something surpassed, something out of fashion … nothing could be more wrong! Radio remains a safe option in case of emergency, when internet black out, when other communication devises may fail, the radio remains, it does not need repeaters, as the radio waves propagate in space!

HF transmissions are therefore subjected to the Propagation condition which is influenced by the solar activity and in particular periods of the year,  operators must know the MUF (Maximum Usable Frequency) and check Propagation Prediction tables in order to know when and in which direction looking for to make some possible contacts

Bhagwati Prasad Semwal is a good experienced Ham Radio Operator, licensed as VU3BPZ, and operating from Antarctica since 2001. Bagwati Prasad (Ex-20,24,29th, Maitri & 31th,Bharati, WOT )has been active from several Antarctic sites as VU3BPZ/P, VU3BPZ/RI1, AT1ØBP, VU3BPZ/MM and actually he is part of the 35th ISEA (2015-2016) based at  Bharati Station (69°S, 076°E), Larsemann Hills, Antarctica where he operates as 8T2BH.

Worldwide Ham Radio Community is grateful to the Indian Antarctic Dept. for putting licensed Ham radio operators among the Teams overwintering in Antarctica; India did a real great job with the Hams involved in Antarctica up to now; a mention has to be given to:

ATØA operating from Daskshin Gangotry Base in the 8Øties, AT3D, VU3HKQ, VU2AXA, VU2JBK, VU3RAY, VU2DMT who have been active from Maitri Base, Indian Bay and Bharati Stations giving a huge number of Antarctic chasers worldwide, a chance  to log all the 3 main  Indian Scientific Stations in their log with different callsigns.

Actually propagation is not in a good shape; solar flux, sunspot and A index are at a low level, but taking care of the rare openings on different bands, is possible to establish good contacts with a range of 10-15.000 km.

What is actually missed in the Indian Bases is a rotating Log periodic beam antenna, able to cover all HF bands in case of internet black out or emergency, a liner amplifier in order to ensure a robust signal in case of lack of propagation.

In addition another tool is available for Hams,  and that is the VOACAP Prediction available online at:

http://www.voacap.com/prediction.html .

This web site gives an idea to a Radio operator  which band of the HF Band plan is the best one to be used  and percentage of chances to make good contacts. Actually conditions are very low and infact just the bands  from 18 to 24 MHz offer 40% of possibility to make contacts.

During the 35th Indian Antarctic Scientific Expedition (2015-2016) we did a lot of propagation testing on different bands from 10 mts through 40 mts SSB and we noticed a very fast changing conditions and so far only about 100 QSOs have been made as 8T2BH from Bharati Station, even if with 15 different Countries. Nothing to compare with 2011-2012’s season when the QSOs made were over 1000, or from Maitri Station where conditions were so much favorable.

Now  it could be propagation will change, no more Auroras or magnetic storms which are causing terrific noise on the band. I hope to be able to keep uphold the Indian pride and using the privilege to be here in Antarctica for the 5th time  as Ham Radio and Communication Officer to fulfill the many requests for QSOs by Radio amateurs operators around the world.

Antarctica: Stronger Ocean circulation

Notorious Ocean current is far stronger than previously thought

The Antarctic Circumpolar Current is the only ocean current to circle the planet and the largest wind-driven current on Earth. It’s also 30% more powerful than scientists realized.

Source: Geophysical Research Letters

An ocean circulation model shows the Antarctic Circumpolar Current swirling around Antarctica, with slow-moving water in blue and warmer colors indicating faster speeds (red represents speeds above 1 mile per hour). But how much water is really flowing through the current?
Recent fieldwork provides unexpected results.

Credit: M. Mazloff, MIT; Source: San Diego Supercomputer Center, UC San Diego

 

More at: https://eos.org/research-spotlights/notorious-ocean-current-is-far-stronger-than-previously-thought

Call for journalists to follow next Antarctic campaign

PNRA (Italian National Research Program in Antarctica) via CNR and ENEA, is managing  the Italian Bases in Antarctica. There is a  call for journalists to participate the XXXIII Italian Expedition in Antarctica.

The XXXIII Italian Expedition, will take place from October 2017 through  February 2018. PNRA offers hospitality at the Italian Bases to a journalist whose reports  might  have extensive media coverage related to the Italian scientific research activities in Antarctica. The selected journalist will be engaged in November 2017, for a period of approximately 15 days, travels to/from Italy included.

Participation is subject to availability confirmation by the PNRA.

More at:  http://www.enea.it/it/Stampa/news/call-per-giornalisti-al-seguito-dei-ricercatori-in-antartide/

Argentine Icebreaker Irizar readying for Antarctica sailing

Argentina’s Navy icebreaker ARA Almirante Irizar is back on sea and next September will be ready to sail to Antarctica following almost ten years of recovery and refurbishing after she caught fire in 2007 when returning from Antarctica and was considered almost a wreck given the magnitude of the damages experienced.

According to Argentine defense reports the “new” Irizar has state of the art technology, has doubled its Antarctic Gas Oil (fuel) capacity and has increased six fold the area dedicated to labs and other scientific activities, as well as the cabins and beds for research staff.

The pre-accident Irizar was mainly involved in logistics and support for the Antarctic bases and stations, but the refurbished version is geared to scientific research. Likewise the icebreaker will be able to access the most austral of Argentine bases, Belgrano II, and the Argentine navy can again operate with helicopters.

All these years Argentina contracted mostly Russian icebreakers and helicopters to service and supply its bases.

More at:  http://www.marambio.aq/infoprensa/julio2017.html   

40th ATCM – Beijing, China

The Antarctic Treaty Consultative Meeting (ATCM) is the annual meeting for all parties of the Antarctic Treaty to discuss pressing Antarctic issues. Only consultative parties – parties that have demonstrated their interest in Antarctica by ‘conducting substantial research activity there’ – are allowed to take part in decision-making processes. This is the first time that China hosts the ATCM, which attracted a lot of attention both within and outside China.

Picture show Chinese Vice Premier Zhang Gaoli addresses the opening ceremony of the 40th Antarctic Treaty Consultative Meeting (ATCM) in Beijing, capital of China.

Read more at: http://blogs.adelaide.edu.au/law/2017/07/06/40th-antarctic-treaty-consultative-meeting-beijing-china/

Getting married in Antarctica

Polar field guides Julie Baum and Tom Sylvester got married in sub-zero temperatures in a two-day celebration.

The wedding guests included the couple’s 18 colleagues who live and work at the British Antarctic Survey’s (BAS) largest research station during the winter months.  It is the first official wedding to take place on the territory in Adelaide Island.
Read more at: http://www.ndtv.com/offbeat/in-a-stunning-first-couple-marries-in-antarctica-in-sub-zero-temperatures-1726174

Antarctica’s ice-free areas to increase

Climate change will cause ice-free areas on Antarctica to increase by up to a quarter by 2100, threatening the diversity of the unique terrestrial plant and animal life that exists there, according to projections from the first study examining the question in detail. If emissions of greenhouse gasses are not reduced, projected warming and changes in snowfall will cause ice-free areas – which currently make up about 1% of  Antarctica and are home to all of the continent’s terrestrial plants and animals – to increase by as much as 17,000 square kilometres.

Read more at: https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/jun/29/antarcticas-ice-free-areas-to-increase-by-up-to-a-quarter-by-2100-study-says

VU2VP Silent Key

 Ved Prakash Sandlas, VU2VP, destingushed Scientist & former Cheif controller R&D DRDO did  pass away on 6th July 2017. He was good promoter of Ham radio & sent Ham Radio Rigs to Antarctica.

He was Vice Presendent of the Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation (AMSAT- India), a real Senior Old Timer. He has been QSL manager for AT3D, operated by VU3DEN in 1994 from Maitri Base, Antarctica.

Our deepest condolences to his family from the whole HAM & Scientists  as well as the Antarctic community !